What’s in the Box?

Meat by Bones Monroe has a strange, frightening, attractive cover. The author name could be a pseudonym, maybe not but it goes along with the cover. The combination attracts readers like me who favor horror and thriller books. What did I actually find? A benevolent “terminator.” You will have to read the entire short story to find out how I interpreted this. You may disagree. At 50 pages and at a price of USD 0.00 (not Kindle Unlimited) it is an easy investment and an interesting time filler. The surprise is (and this is not a spoiler) the horror is almost not there. The “almost” is because there might be a few snippets the reader will think it is gross or yucky but the overall content is very tame. I was surprised.

Clara and Emmet are neighborhood busybodies. They really need to get a life. Absent that, the couple spies on neighbor Jason. They note that Jason has visitors but sometimes the visitors enter Jason’s house and never exit. Clara is pretty accepting of whatever Jason is doing; he is not hurting anybody as far as she can see. Emmett, however, needs to feel he is doing something. Dean McHenry went into Jason’s house and never exited. Emmett wants to know why and is determined to find out. At the same time he wants to enlist Clara’s aid but she is unmotivated. How can he prove to Clara the existence of nefarious activities on the part of Jason?

Emmet is a man of action. Breaking into Jason’s house he finds some evidence of unusual activity. If that wasn’t bad enough, he observed neighbor Ingrid entering Jason’s house with her son Matt. The boy didn’t come out but Ingrid exited the house crying. That did it for Emmett. It was time for action. Entering Jason’s house, Emmet fought Jason and succeeded in giving Jason a dose of his own medicine (not literally).

Jason has now disappeared. But the story is far from over. It will linger on in the lives of Jason’s “victims.” But they were not really the victims of Jason. Who was responsible?

This is not a formulaic horror story. It is horror with a conscience and is quite unusual. This short story is appropriate for 15-year-old readers and up. Young adult readers might think some of the descriptions are more yucky than horrific.

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