The Storyteller by Rob Burton is a very short story about a global, philosophical topic. Does man have free will or is there predestination controlled by deities of whichever religion one subscribes to? This story will not provide answers, it will inject yet another factor into the mix, the role of the Storyteller.

The Storyteller is a contradiction. He hates to make choices about anything, such as what to have for breakfast. Yet he makes thousand of choices per day as he determines the fate of others that he has had some physical contact with. This may seem to make him the Devil or God but he denies being either. This is logical when he mentions that he is not the only one in the world. There may be hundreds or thousands in existence.

Present Day Ghosts

The Ghosts of Scotland is, as the subtitle explains, a collection of ghost stories from across the Scottish nation. Written by Sean McLachlan with input from Charles River Editors, the collection has five stories, a four-page bibliography citing seventeen sources, two online resource links, and links leading to free and discounted offers by Charles River Editors.

Fallen Angels by Marvin J. Wolf and Katherine Mader is described in its subtitle as a chronicle of L.A. (Los Angeles) crime and mystery. Yep, I know that “everybody” knows L.A. stands for Los Angeles but there are those unfamiliar with the United States that might think L.A. is a genre of crime and mystery that involves the use of leather articles (LA) so I wanted to clear that up. This novel fulfills the requirements of a chronicle as it presents true crime accounts from 1847 to 1983. There is a fascinating addendum at the end dated 1987 which provides updates to the earlier reported Thelma Todd mystery. This is crime reporting with many irrefutable facts referenced in an approximately 11-page bibliography. Some may argue this is not a novel due to the reporting of so much factual information. But there are also a lot of unsolved mysteries and possibilities presented. The idea that studios staged crime scenes to protect contract actors may have a basis in truth. The reader will probably question why there was so much time between a death and the report of the death to the police. Because of conjectures, no one knew what really went on in the “missing time” sequences, I call this work a novel.

Three thoughts on this one. First, it is sad to hear that what started out as a lovely morning stroll…

In 13: A Baker’s Dozen of Suspense and Horror Tales by David Six, I will comment on each story, but they do have one common factor that I think will be good to look out for before you read. This struck me about three stories in. Watch this author’s talent for description. Do that and these stories will capture your attention. In some stories, the plot moves slowly but the talent the author displays with description makes all the stories worth reading.

The Man Behind the Bar by Chris Sarantopoulos is a short story (locations 201) which I received from Instafreebie, a platform for free giveaways and book promotions.

The bar sign said Ben Stingler’s place but when the hitman entered the bar, the bartender knew that he, the bartender, was entering a life and death situation. Either he or the hitman would soon be dead. The bartender, real name Phil Harisson, had a shotgun on a swivel just under the bar. Phil might be able to come out of this alive. The hitman was straightforward about his mission. He laid his Baretta pistol on the bar and asked Phil what had gone wrong; what had he done to anger boss Bocca so much that today it had come to this? Phil was himself a hitman with quite a tally of successes. Phil knew, thought it was logical, that one day he might occupy the same position as those he had dispatched. Phil was not resigned to it; he had changed his name, moved to a new city, and opened a bar. Obviously, that had not worked.

Detective Pauls was a bored cop with nothing to do around the house. It was an involuntary vacation forced on him by the boss while Internal Affairs was investigating him for the shooting (not accidental) of a 14-year-old juvenile entrepreneur who had been repairing a neighbor’s window at 1:00 AM in the dark without any light source to aid him. Civil libertarians were screaming for his blood while ignoring his claims of a justified shooting. While resting, Pauls had performed every household chore possible which would have made his wife proud if he had a wife. Pauls almost welcomed a call for his expertise in the investigation of a suspicious suicide at a nearby shooting range. Immediate identification of the victim was almost impossible due to an atomized, thus missing, head but Pauls would try to work with what he had. One piece of evidence Pauls would eventually find is in the title, The Girl on the Videotape by Ruth Parker.

This looks like a fun thing to do. Twittering Tales #59 – 21 November 2017 is a project from the awesomely…

From the title, we can guess that A Perfect Society is a series prequel. This short story sets the scene…

Reading this is like sticking a mixing device in your brain and setting the mixer speed to high. However, it…