Try Kindle Unlimited (KU)

The following is a brief review of a brief overview. I am a fan of Kindle Unlimited (KU) and frequently mention it in my book reviews as a good alternative to the high costs of books in my expat living situation (Indonesia).

Kindle Unlimited: Is It Right for YOU? by Charles Wright is described in the following subtitle: “A Brief Guide to Understand the Positives and Negatives.” At eleven pages, it meets the requirements of brief. For me, the authorship was confusing. Released in 2015 by author Sherry Everett, it appears here as written by Charles Wright. I will place my question about why this is so in the basket for things I no longer care about and will not investigate further. Because I am an avid fan of Kindle Unlimited (it works well for me) I wanted to see what others thought the negatives were. Being a positive person, here we go.

POSITIVES:

I read a lot. My personal goal is one novel per day (250-350 pages). Do I get there? Maybe. I tend to read four or five novels at a time and sometimes finish several in one day, so I am not quite sure how it averages out. It would be a waste of time and take away from my reading time to try and figure it out. It would also be boring. When I find a novel such as The Butterfly Garden by Dot Hutchison (280 pages) I complete the novel in about five hours. It is a very fast-paced horror and psychological thriller novel. Reading in the way I do can be expensive. With Kindle Unlimited I was able to read the book for “free” as well as listen to it on Amazon’s Audible site.

Sure, Kindle Unlimited is a subscription service at ten dollars per month. For those who want to argue that it is only USD 9.99, go ahead. I can’t think that way. I don’t consider the price a positive or a negative; it is just the cost of a service that works for me. Many of the books offered come with the Audible.com listening option which is at no additional cost.

Many books offered on KU are by independent authors but there are also the well-established writers who run promotions. I watch for J. A. Konrath’s works to show up on KU. Then there are the classics, many of which show up on KU. I recently downloaded works by Poe and Bronte. I keep them in my KU library until my son finishes using them for his assignments. They take up two slots in my queue of ten allowed books.

For expatriates KU is great. I live in Indonesia where print books are subject to a very high import tax. This translates to libraries with more shelving than books. Most of my reading is on Kindle and the variety offered by KU saves me lots of money.

Flash fiction and novellas do not have many pages, but they typically sell on Amazon for USD 0.99 to USD 2.99. Voracious readers can save a lot with a monthly subscription to KU.

NEGATIVES

You must give the books back. You can’t keep more than ten of them at a time.  I have read some remarkable novels that I felt compelled to purchase after reading them just so I could discuss them in a book club setting.

If you don’t read a lot, this is not for you. It ranks with the magazine subscriptions you bought, the ones with six months of unread editions.

Did you notice my positives outnumbered my negatives? The author (whoever it really is) didn’t come up with any negatives that hadn’t occurred to me and I still feel the negatives are minor compared to the positives. As far as a rating for this brief presentation, I gave it 2.8 stars. Which I can’t do. That’s like USD 9.99 per month. So, I will give it a grudging three stars in the spirit of rounding up.

Kindle Unlimited Membership Plans

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