Brutal Memories

Identity Crisis by Bones Monroe is not a story of multiple identities although that was my first thought when seeing the author’s name. Monroe writes novels of horror. The language is extremely graphic, sometimes sexual, sometimes violent. For this novel, the flavor of violence is horror with minor sexual shading. Think (or not, your choice) dismemberment. I think it’s only proper to put the warning in the first paragraph. You have been warned. I gave the story only three-plus Amazon stars due to bad proofreading. There were missing words, superfluous words, and completely wrong words. In one place Damon has completely disabled Frank. In the following sentence, Frank throws a chair against a wall to attract the attention of Cedric or Ozzie. Nope. It was Damon that threw the chair. Mistakes like that, combined with others, cause me to assign only three stars. The plus is because of the engaging central premise.

Damon used to be a bad guy. Hiding in a special senior citizen center ignored by police where most occupants are guilty of some sort of crime, Damon has found a way to become a better person. He will sell his bad memories to Quinn; a brain implants black marketer. The process is not a one-time transfer but as Damon gets rid of more bad memories, his new-found good impulses will fill gaps with more humanist thoughts. The bad memories Damon sells are connected to the multiple murders he committed.

Frank is a wimp under complete control of his wife. He remembers that he didn’t use to be that way but sometime during his marriage to Susan control moved to her. Frank felt that the more he agreed with her, the more he served her, the better things would be. The opposite was true and Frank realized this but didn’t know what to do. Then he discovered Dr. Quinn and brain implants. If Frank could buy the memories of a more assertive person, he could work his way back to the positive and decisive man Susan had fallen in love with.

It should not surprise the reader that Frank bought at least one of Damon’s memories. But not all of them (and that is important). What are the odds of Damon and Frank meeting? In this novel, it is 100%. Damon and Frank are deeply disturbed individuals. Less disturbed individuals surround them. Maybe Monroe will groom them for later horribleness. Ozzie is morally corrupt and physically unattractive. Cedric is a wannabe cop (these are always dangerous). If you love cats, skip the section on Mort and the smoking cats. Olivia is just a busybody; she harms no one.

There is not a lot of character development. I cared about none of them but the idea of the story was interesting. I was happy to read this for free on Kindle Unlimited. There are many books I read for free that I would not want to pay for. This is one of those stories one might take a guilty pleasure in reading but not want to display in a bookcase and reveal to neighbors one’s reading interests.

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