My Partner is an Orange

Photo by Erol Ahmed on Unsplash

This book was downloaded through Instafreebie. Described as “A Bright City” novella, Monsters Inside by Ric Rae has an annotation that the copy I downloaded is a Beta copy. That might excuse the fact that there are many typos and editing problems that would normally cause me to abandon the novel after the first few mistakes. However, I stayed with it because of its strange twists and turns. It is almost as if the writer was on drugs while writing it.

The “monsters” are mostly human in this nineteen-chapter novella. Each chapter has as its title the name of one of the five main protagonists. Pepper’s monster is the willingness to kill those who have wronged her. Forget any argument that killing is wrong. Robert Gourd, or Robbo, might be a sex addict, his monster. Virginia’s monster is practically indescribable. I don’t know what it is called when someone tries to implant fruit with human body parts to create a better sex partner. Callum is a mercenary willing to do anything for money. That monster seems to be prevalent in modern society. Jules has a taste for human flesh. Professor Zeaxanthin, the developer of Fleshtech, likes to experiment with human subjects without government approval or the consent of the subjects.

This novella has two beginnings. All actions stem from Chapter One, in which Pepper kills Robbo in a way which deserves a TRIGGER WARNING. The way she kills Robert is very graphic and will leave images hard to forget. The second beginning is in Chapter Two when Virginia is following the Yellow Man and he drops a black cloth bag. Virginia, trying to be helpful, picks up the bag with the intent of returning it. But she feels the urge to look inside. The only thing inside the bag is an orange. Virginia thinks this strange until the orange winks at her.

Everything goes downhill from here in one of the most ridiculous tales I have read to date. Many of us have probably had the experience of witnessing something that is so bad we can not turn away. That is this novella. It is so bad that I tried to find the background of the author. No luck. Because I downloaded it through Instafreebie, supposedly I am on the author’s mailing list. I look forward to seeing where this author turns up. There is a broken link at the end of the novella inviting me to submit a review. Amazon does not recognize the title or author.

Any possible value in this novel lies in its introduction of two new pieces of information. I now know that dermestid beetles can be used to get rid of annoying corpses that may show up in your apartment. Copying anything from the novella to this review such as this unusual line: “How did you recover from finding out your eye had been surgically integrated with an orange, and you were still able see from it?” (Kindle location 668) produces what looks like publisher information, “Friction Fiction.” Google search told me nothing about the publisher but did provide other information about what type of fiction I might find under this category. I would not describe it as a genre but it is a niche market, not one for sensitive readers.

I gave this one Amazon star even though I couldn’t rate it on Amazon. This will go on my list of worthless reads. I did, however, find it fascinating in its horribleness. Typos and poor editing contributed to my negative impressions but if an author clearly labels something as “Beta,” allowances should be made so I ignored several of those issues. Out of six hundred reviews of novels and short stories I have done for this project, less than five written works have been this bad. To know really good writing, we must know its opposite to make comparisons. This novella served a purpose.

 

 

 

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