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Wed. Aug 21st, 2019

Read 4 Fun

Read the short reviews, read the book, comment

Don’t Go Into The Corn

2 min read

Belief in evil, the Devil, or monsters in whatever form is the subject of The Cornfield by Anne Nowlin. Annie listened carefully to her grandmother when Granny warned her not to go into the cornfield. As an adult, Annie may have thought that the warning was not really about the cornfield. It was rather about the train tracks and the river beyond the cornfield. Go too far into the field and you risk getting close to the tracks and getting hit by a train. A bit further and there is a risk drowning. So really the warning about the field was the setting up of a buffer zone to keep young people away from real danger. That theory would hold up except for Paul.

 

Paul was not a friend of Annie although they were almost the same age. Annie could detect signs of a bully Paul might become. Paul was a rule breaker determined to follow his own drummer. When he invited Annie to go with him to visit the railroad tracks, Annie instead followed Granny’s advice. When Paul’s mom came to Annie’s home asking about Paul, Annie confessed to knowing Paul’s plan. Paul’s mom called the police and Annie’s grandmother began to search the cornfield row by row. Granny didn’t search the tracks or the river. Annie’s belief in Granny’s warnings increased.

Many times, during Annie’s youth, she had dreams of the ghoulish things that might have happened to Paul. She was happy when her family moved out of the house. Years later, at the age of sixteen, Annie went to a party where her friend, Leslie got too drunk and was in danger of some evil consequences. An unidentified stranger dressed in typical farmer garb approached Annie as she was sitting outside the party to avoid noise and smoke. The stranger seemed to know about Leslie and impending danger. The stranger warned Annie to leave and take Leslie with her.

Pairing that experience with her remembered warnings from Granny, Annie concluded:

The Cornfield is always with us.

This pleasant morality story is only eleven pages. It sells for USD 0.99 on Amazon; there is not a Kindle Unlimited option. I gave this short story four Amazon stars and recommend its use in a class for English as a Second Language users.

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