Historical Fiction, Suffragette Experiences

The Fall of White City by N. S. Wikarski is a work of historical fiction inside of which is embedded a crime mystery. I like history. As an ex-law enforcement type, crime continues to interest me. The identity of the perpetrator and motives for the crime committed are elements of a complex mystery. This work reminds me of the style of Agatha Christie but with more emphasis on the female suffragette angle. This novel should be highly entertaining for those with some knowledge of the 1893 Chicago World Fair and surrounding social issues of the day. The reader might feel a sense of nostalgia. For those with no knowledge of the time period, fascinating historical facts such as the distribution of telephones in Chicago, and the capacity of passenger cars on the newfangled Ferris Wheel might promote further reading. This is Book One in the Victorian Chicago Mystery Series. I will follow it up with Book Two, Shrouded in Thought as well as investigate other series by this talented author.

Take Time To Reflect

Impressions by Dan Groat is a very impressive (sorry, I know better but I couldn’t resist) collection of short reflections on the daily grind of our lives, also known as existence. This is one of those collections that is valuable to keep around for when you are feeling just a bit down and unfocused. It will, at the very least, redirect your attention to things that are a bit more meaningful than immediate routines we are forced to go through on a daily basis. This was selected as a Book of the Day (BOTD) by the folks at OnLine BookClub on 11 January 2017. The following comments are about some of my favorite selections. There are 55 reflections; there is no way I will comment on each of them. Buy the book; it will make you happy.

A True Spy Story

The Spy With No Name by Jeff Maysh is a 59 page Kindle Single published 02 January 2017 by Kindle Digital Services LLC and available through the Kindle Unlimited subscription system. It is a true spy story which I find a near contradiction in terms. If it is a true espionage tale, how can anyone verify the truth? A reader can at best accept an interpretation of what happened.

Total Weirdness with Warnings

I like flash fiction. By its nature, all flash fiction is not created alike but this collection takes weirdness to some new levels. So, I will start out with some warnings. To say the least, this is some adult stuff. But I want to quote warnings from the work itself.

From the Introduction:

“This is not a story collection with any underpinning narrative. These are syringes filled with words. Fumbles in the dark with a stranger. This is a collection you can open up to a random page in order to hook yourself up with a quick fix of fun. Grab a tasty treat between meals. A quickie in the staff-room on your lunch-break. Maybe have just one more for the road. You know you want to.

Flash Me!: The Sinthology (Kindle Locations 91-95). Solarcide. Kindle Edition.