Colorful Extreme Descriptive Vocabulary

In order to cut to the chase early: WARNING, Extremely explicit and gory.
and
Don’t waste your time, although that did not stop me from writing the following rant.

Shawcross Letters has an important subtitle: My Journey Into The Mind Of Evil by John Paul Fay (and Brian Whitney). Brian Whitney is the author of this publication. John Paul Fay is a narrator and commentator. Fay is a commentator when revealing the content of letters written by Arthur Shawcross, an actual serial killer who died in 2008. Fay acts as a narrator when he describes his own struggles with life. Incarcerated Shawcross has been described as evil personified. A serial killer with a fondness for cooking and eating various victim body parts, Shawcross never meets Fay except through letters. If evil personified means the person is a unique representation of evil, Fay would disagree. Fay describes Shawcross as almost a soulmate. It seems as if Fay is saying that he would be Shawcross if only he (Fay) were braver. For now, Fay claims to be able to sublimate the same evil acts described by Shawcross in letters into Fay’s own writings with this book.

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Imperfect Creatures

Fallen Angels by Marvin J. Wolf and Katherine Mader is described in its subtitle as a chronicle of L.A. (Los Angeles) crime and mystery. Yep, I know that “everybody” knows L.A. stands for Los Angeles but there are those unfamiliar with the United States that might think L.A. is a genre of crime and mystery that involves the use of leather articles (LA) so I wanted to clear that up. This novel fulfills the requirements of a chronicle as it presents true crime accounts from 1847 to 1983. There is a fascinating addendum at the end dated 1987 which provides updates to the earlier reported Thelma Todd mystery. This is crime reporting with many irrefutable facts referenced in an approximately 11-page bibliography. Some may argue this is not a novel due to the reporting of so much factual information. But there are also a lot of unsolved mysteries and possibilities presented. The idea that studios staged crime scenes to protect contract actors may have a basis in truth. The reader will probably question why there was so much time between a death and the report of the death to the police. Because of conjectures, no one knew what really went on in the “missing time” sequences, I call this work a novel.

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Unjustly Jailed?

I opened my emails this morning (11 November 2017) to find an offer from Wild Blue Press to review a copy of Targeted by M. William Phelps. The book is a non-fiction true-crime novel, a type that I really like but so many of the ones I have read put me off to the point that I avoid the genre. This one, however, was inciteful, thoughtful, balanced, and so detailed that the general reader might shy away from it. But just as the reader might be nodding off like some of the jurors Phelps describes, the author takes a break and follows a new tangent to draw the reader’s attention back to the wider, more comprehensive, less detailed but still interesting context.

Tracy Fortson is a murder. Juries have spoken, judges have decided sentencing, Tracy is in prison currently serving a mandated life plus ten-year sentence for killing Doug Benton and this condition is unlikely to change short of possible parole board clemency. There is no surprise ending, no “gotcha” moment in the book. So, why read the novel? I am a “Law and Order,” “Homicide Hunter,” and “CSI” fan as well as a former sheriff’s deputy. Tracy Fortson is a former sheriff’s deputy. So much for why I am interested. Feel free to read and review this and explain why you think it is interesting.

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