Million Dollar Baby

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Alicia by Michelle Miller can be found as one of the Amazon Original Stories (AOS) in a collection titled The Fairer Sex. This is Book Three of an eight-book series. All can be read one at a time for free with a Kindle Unlimited subscription or the collection can be purchased as a set (not for free). All the short stories emphasize “short.” Alicia, the third story in the series is only twenty pages. Grab a mug of your favorite brew. Not a large mug, you won’t be able to finish it before you finish the story.

Shopping Organic

Here is a comment I posted at the end of this review. I want to repeat here. This short story has very descriptive writing related to sex. It falls far short of porn, but it is NSFW (not this review, the short story). Consider this a trigger warning.

Meredith by Michelle Miller can be found as one of the Amazon Original Stories (AOS) in a collection titled The Fairer Sex. This is Book Two of an eight-book series. All can be read one at a time for free with a Kindle Unlimited subscription or the collection can be purchased as a set (not for free). All the short stories emphasize “short.” Meredith, the second story in the series is only sixteen pages. Grab a cup of coffee. You will get wrapped up in the story, but you can finish it before your coffee gets cold.

Perfect

Candace by Michelle Miller can be found as one of the Amazon Original Stories (AOS) in a collection titled The Fairer Sex. This is Book One of an eight-book series. All can be read one at a time for free with a Kindle Unlimited subscription or the collection can be purchased as a set (not for free). all the short stories emphasize “short.” Candace, the first story in the series is only twelve pages. Grab a cup of coffee. You will finish the story before you finish the coffee.

Have a Heart

Carly was a very serious student of the Bible. She listened to the Pastor’s sermon every week and followed up with research to find Bible quotations that would illustrate and supplement the weekly message given by the Pastor. In Hypocrites by LuAnne Turnage, we meet Carly as she attempts to get in serious morning study before husband Paul woke up and prepared for work. Luckily, Paul was knowledgeable of Bible verses and could direct her studies. She had so many questions.

We Can Live On Beer

In Idle Hands by LuAnne Turnage, we meet a retired couple, Joe and Eva. They had lived their adult working lives in the woods of Michigan but had lived in retirement in Florida for twenty-one years. This made them very old; they might even be past their expiry dates except for the beer. There was only one thing older than Joe and Eva; something that could outlive anyone and anything: cockroaches. Eva had been terrified of them when she first moved to Florida but after an introduction to the local exterminator, she was able to lead a “normal” life.

Strange Flashes

Flashes of Death and Darkness by Eli Taff, Jr. has a publication launch date of 19 February 2019, but I received an advance copy from the author because I liked and reviewed some of his earlier writing. Taff writes short flash fiction and claims that each story is exactly 500 words. Despite the temptation to count each word, I will bypass the challenge and just read the stories as I open another beer. The ten stories in this collection are one-beer read. There is an introduction (of exactly 500 words) and an afterword (of 50 words) but the additional reading should not spark another visit to the fridge. With such short stories, my comments will be one or two sentences as initial takeaway impressions. No spoilers. No pontification. Few Puns. Lots of Flash (as in lightning quick impressions).

Is Laurie Real?

The Colors of Autumn by Jay Lemming is a coming of age very short story. At only fourteen pages, this should take a reader about one-half a cup of coffee (caffeinated) to read. I found this story as I was wandering through some Amazon author pages and stumbled across this sentence: “The Colors of Autumn is the tale of a dying season and of naivete brought to the doorstep of depravity.” It is not fair to put such shiny objects in the path of an eclectic reader.

Read For Fun Or Challenge

Ultimate Brainbusters Part I by Jonathan Smith has this intriguing blurb on its cover. “Twenty-one short stories within 250 words with incredible plot twists.” I was alerted to the existence of this publication by an email from the author. On Amazon, it sells for USD 0.99 and I bought it with the original intention of reading for entertainment. Then I decided to make it a something-to-do project. My challenge to myself was to read each story and come up with a first impression takeaway line. The emphasis is on “first impression,” something like a reaction word or phrase on a Rorschach inkblot test. The further challenge is: The instant impression cannot be a spoiler, retaining the “incredible” in the plot twist for other readers.

Susan Knows

Playing Flashlight Tag by Jay Lemming is a very short story (19 pages) about developing relationships in a group of approximately thirteen-year-old boys. That is the way it started. There was a core group of boys from families that had lived in the neighborhood for several years. Billy, Andrew, and Joey formed this group. They eventually invited Tommy, a new arrival the previous year. They played Flashlight Tag in neighborhood yards every evening they could. One night a ghostly figure appeared to scare Billy but was only Sean, a class troublemaker, wearing a sheet. When the five boys were joined by a girl new to the neighborhood, Susan, this becomes a story of developing relationships and petty jealousies.

Unusual Hair Styles

Sherlock Holmes: Case of the Face of Death is a short story by John Pirillo. Master Garretson was a strict teacher not completely admired by all students. No matter the type of student, it was the end of the week and all were looking forward to the end of the school day and the start of the weekend. On this Friday, Master Garretson was finally going to ask Miss Carrol the secret of the curls on her forehead. No matter how she moved her head, the curls never moved. He had observed this for weeks. Today, he would hold her after class and ask the reason.